6 Mar, 2017

Benchmarking Against Physics: Increasing Production Today, Not Tomorrow

Many companies use benchmarking data shared anonymously with other participants in the survey. The problem is they will not have exactly the same assets. What’s being recommended here is that you benchmark yourself against physics and not others. Click to learn more!

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1 Feb, 2017

Pressure Effect on the Condensate Stabilizer Column Performance: Part 5

This tip is the follow up of January 2017 Tip of the Month (TOTM,) which investigated a non-refluxed condensate stabilizer column having a split design where a portion of the feed is pre-heated by heat exchange with the bottoms product

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3 Jan, 2017

Non-Refluxed Split-Feed Condensate Stabilizer Column-Part 4

This tip is the follow up of December 2016 Tip of the Month (TOTM), which investigated the benefits of having a water-draw and its optimum location in a non-refluxed condensate stabilizer column.

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5 Dec, 2016

Water-Draw in a Non-Refluxed Condensate Stabilizer Column: Part 3

This tip is the follow up of the previous tips (April and May 2016), which investigated the benefits of having a water-draw and its optimum location in a condensate stabilizer column. It will simulate the performance of an operating condensate stabilizer column equipped with side water-draw tray to remove liquid water.

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3 Nov, 2016

Charts and Correlation for Estimating Methanol Removal in TEG Gas Dehydration Process

Continuing the October 2010 tip of the month (TOTM), in this TOTM we will consider the presence of methanol in the produced oil/water/gas stream and determine the quantitative traces of methanol ending up in the TEG dehydrated gas.

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4 Oct, 2016

Charts and Correlations for Estimating Methanol Removal in the Gas Sweetening Process

The gas-sweetening process by amines like methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) removes a considerable amount of methanol from a sour gas stream. Moreover, if the methanol content of the sour gas is high, the sweet gas may still retain high methanol content and can cause operational troubles in the downstream processes.

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7 Sep, 2016

Estimating Methanol Removal in the NGL Sweetening Process

Similar to the gas-sweetening process, the methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) liquid-sweetening process removes a considerable amount of methanol from a sour NGL (Natural Gas Liquid) stream. Moreover, if the methanol content of the sour NGL is high, the sweetened NGL may still retain high methanol content and can cause operational troubles in the downstream processes. Provisions of purging reflux (Water Draw) of the regenerator column and its replacement with “Fresh Water” can improve methanol recovery.

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2 Aug, 2016

Determining Traces of Methanol in the NGL Sweetening Process

Similar to the July 2016 TOTM, this tip will consider the presence of methanol in the sour NGL stream and determine the quantitative traces of methanol ending up in the sweet NGL, flash gas and acid gas streams.

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1 Jul, 2016

Determining Traces of Methanol in the Gas Sweetening Process

This tip will consider the presence of methanol in the sour gas stream and determine the quantitative traces of methanol ending up in the sweet gas, flash gas and acid gas streams. To achieve this, the tip simulates a simplified MDEA gas sweetening unit by computer.

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6 Jun, 2016

Projecting the Performance of Adsorption Dehydration Process

PetroSkills | John M Campbell’s May 2015 tip of the month (TOTM) presented a method which allows the users to estimate the decline of their adsorbent based on only one performance test run (PTR) for molecular sieve dehydrators using low pressure regeneration. This permits early formulation of a credible action plan. Site-specific factors will determines an adsorption unit’s decline curve. Consequently, conducting more than PTR is highly recommended. A poorly performing inlet separator, for example, could result in a unit exhibiting a more pronounced decline than indicated by the generic performance decline curves.

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