20 Jan, 2016

What is the impact of Nitrogen on the Natural Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions?

Previously, we've discussed the hydrate phase behavior of sour natural gas mixtures. Specifically, we looked at carbon dioxide inhibits the hydrate formation slightly while hydrogen sulfide enhances hydrate formation considerably. This Tip of the Month (TOTM) will extend the previous study on the natural gas hydrate formation phase behavior. Specifically, it will study the impact of nitrogen on the formation of hydrate in a natural gas mixture.

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6 Jan, 2016

How Do We Use the Results from Velocity Analysis in our Seismic Data?

Seismic velocities derived from moveout velocity analysis can be used to interpolate between wells or may be the only velocity information available in a new basin. This white paper will explore how we use the results from the velocity analyses, make corrections for lag, and account for floating datum.

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7 Dec, 2015

Improvements in the Steels Used in Oil and Gas Processing Equipment over the Last Half Century

In the post-World war II period, the steels used in the oil and gas industry were quite different from what we use today. This tip of the month (TOTM) presents a brief overview of improvements in the steels used in oil and gas processing equipment for safer and more reliable operations.

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9 Nov, 2015

Adsorption Dehydration: Two-Tower vs. Three-Tower System

There are different process configurations for adsorption dehydration systems. The most common arrangements are two-tower and three-tower configurations. In past articles, we have discussed the efficient operation of molecular sieve dehydration units. Specifically, the benefits of standby time in the adsorption dehydration processes and impact of feed gas conditions. This month’s Tip of the Month compares the required size of major equipment for the two-tower system with the three-tower system, considering a number of key parameters.

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5 Oct, 2015

What is the Impact of Feed Gas Conditions on the Adsorption Dehydration System?

Adsorption dehydration units can reduce the water content of a gas stream to less than 0.1 ppmv. The gas industry normally uses adsorption dehydration units upstream of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant or a deep natural gas liquid (NGL) extraction plant where the gas temperature reduces to less than -160 °C (-256 °F) and -100 °C (-148 °F), respectively. Removal of water content to this very low level is essential to prevent freezing. This month’s article discusses feed gas flow rate, pressure, and temperature effect(s).

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