Browse modules for Drilling, Completions, and Production Engineering below.

For Introductory, Geology, Geophysics, Petrophysics, and Reservoir Engineering modules, browse here.

For Process Safety, Gas Processing, and Mechanical Engineering modules, browse here.

Well Construction / Drilling Modules

  • Oilfield Casing
  • Casing Running Operations

DURATION: approximately 3.5 hours

FEE: $395

 

Casing is pipe that goes into the wellbore and stays in the well because the outside of the casing is cemented to the earth which provides wellbore integrity. In other words, casing’s primary purpose is to keep the wellbore from caving in or fracturing, to keep unwanted fluids from entering the wellbore, and to keep the desired fluids (hydrocarbons) from leaving the borehole at undesirable places.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR individuals interested in the basic use of casing in oil fields

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Describe the purpose of casing in an oilfield well
  • State how joints of casing are connected together
  • Recognize the steps in the process for drilling and cementing casing in an oil/gas well
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the API/ISO casing naming convention
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages to casing produced with seamless and ERW properties
  • Identify casing descriptions and dimensions and, when appropriate, describe the correlation between them
  • Identify where the four different casing applications are in a wellbore schematic

 

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DURATION: approximately 4.5 hours

FEE: $395

 

 

In this module, you will study four topics:

  • Handling Casing: This topic introduces the process of getting the casing to the rig floor. It explains the concept of stacking casing in reverse order, numbering casing, and the types of casing you will see at an oil rig.
  • Rigging up Casing Running Equipment: This topic overviews the running casing checklist, Job Safety Analysis (JSA) and equipment used for setting casing in a borehole. It explains the purpose and function of spiders, elevators, power tongs, and the stabbing board.
  • Making up the Shoe Track: This topic introduces the shoe track and some of the other pieces of a casing string. It explains the purpose of the float shoe, guide shoe, float collar, thread locking compound, and centralizers.
  • Running Casing: This topic provides an in-depth explanation of running the casing into the borehole. It describes the "dance"—the set of steps and movements of the casing crew that help to get the casing in the borehole quickly, efficiently, and safely.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR individuals interested in understanding what it takes to run casing, as well as members of an extended multidiscipline team

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Describe the steps of running casing, from getting the casing to the rig to running the casing into the borehole
  • Determine safe working practices while running casing on a rig
  • Identify responsibilities of and organize all wellsite personnel for normal casing running operations
  • Identify the purpose of the basic running casing equipment and key steps used to run casing

 

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Production and Completions Engineering Modules

  • The Role of Production Technology
  • Production Technology Applications
  • Onshore Conventional Well Completion
  • Design Process for Completion and Workovers
  • Perforating
  • Onshore Unconventional Well Completions
  • Sand Control
  • Hydraulic Fracturing
  • Formation Damage and Matrix Stimulation
  • Flow Assurance and Production Chemistry
  • Production Problem Diagnosis
  • Well Intervention
  • Production Principles
  • Primary and Remedial Cementing
  • Rod, PCP, Jet Pumps, and Plunger Lift
  • Gas Lift and Electrical Submersible Pumps
  • Production Logging
  • Production Logging Wellsite and Downhole Environment

DURATION: approximately 2 hours

FEE: $250

 

Any oil and gas operation has certain key, fundamental aspects and "things that must happen" for the producing asset to be properly developed or re-developed initially and to continue to perform at its optimum efficiency and profitability throughout its life.
 
Well-defined practices and processes must be put in place. The project team and its cumulative skill set necessary to conceive and execute what must happen are essential and indispensable for any oil and gas industry organization.
 
This PetroSkills PetroAcademy blended skills module addresses the concept of Production Technology and the production technologists who define and implement the details of managing a hydrocarbon asset.
 
Production technologists, or a company's PTs as they are often described or labeled, are subject matter experts (SMEs) across all oilfield disciplines who contribute both formally and semi-formally throughout an asset's life. Their team work and focus continually brings both proven oilfield practices as well as prototype emerging and new technology to fruition in a hydrocarbon exploitation development.
 
This module develops the context of what PTs do, how they interact, how they function in leadership roles, and presents many types of production technology applications that are envisioned, initiated, developed in detail, implemented, and managed.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR exploration and production technical professionals, asset team members, team leaders, line managers, IT department staff who work with data and support production applications, data technicians, executive management, and all support staff who require a more extensive knowledge of production technology and engineering.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Define the oilfield term "Production Technology"
  • Describe the technical qualities and character of subject matter experts in oil and gas organizations who are referred to as "production technologists"
  • List various common responsibilities of an industry "production technologist"
  • Recall two cases of well completion design (one for an unconventional shale well and the other for a conventional sandstone well) and the generic routines that a production technologist might follow in making completion design decisions

 

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DURATION: approximately 4.5 hours

FEE: $250

 

This module addresses selected applications which may be put into practice in designing and operating a hydrocarbon asset.
 
Both conventional limestone and sandstone reservoir examples and situations as well as unconventional shale oil and gas reservoirs and various real world applications are presented for discussion. Among various technologies presented are an overview of subsea development, well completion equipment, smart wells and smart field know-how and hardware and software, expandable tubulars, swellable elastomers, produced water shut off chemistry, surveillance practices, and other contemporary production technology advancements regularly utilized in contemporary developments throughout the oilfield.
 

 

 

DESIGNED FOR exploration and production technical professionals, asset team members, team leaders, line managers, IT department staff who work with data and support production applications, data technicians, executive management, and all support staff who require a more extensive knowledge of production technology and engineering.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Describe examples of proven, established, historical oilfield industry Production Technology application and practices
  • Describe examples of more recently developed proven, established, oilfield industry Production Technology application and practices
  • Justify establishing superior oilfield data gathering practices and related data quality control, data organization, and data access methods
  • Recall the history of and present day application and advancement of digitalization in the oilfield
  • Explain the diversity of downhole well completion tool applications and the proper selection of completion equipment

 

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DURATION: approximately 4 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module describes the major tools, techniques, and processes for completing wells in conventional situations.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR Production Operations Staff, Reservoir Engineers, Facilities Staff Drilling and Completion Engineers, Geoscientists, Field Supervisors and Managers, Field Technicians, Service Company Engineers and Managers

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Describe the purpose and basic operational aspects of wellhead, flow control equipment, and the major components used in a basic well completion in conventional plays
  • Describe the impact that drilling practices may have on reservoir productivity
  • Specify the production target of a well, and describe the type of completion or workover design components required to achieve the target
  • Describe the basic properties and function of tubing
  • Describe which fluid systems are the most important for implementing successful completions and workovers in wells in conventional plays
  • Describe the most common equipment components used in conventional wells and what they are used for
  • Describe the most relevant steps for implementing completion procedures in wells in conventional resources plays and the proper interaction with all parties involved required
  • Describe the most relevant aspects of HSE in completion operations
  • Describe how a well flows, the impact of well control on fluid flow, and the most common control and monitoring devices
  • Describe the basic requirements to abandon conventional wells
  • Specify the production target of a horizontal well, and describe how this differs from a typical vertical well

 

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DURATION: approximately 3.5 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module focuses upon three main work products of a typical completion or workover design – the proposed well sketch, the proposed procedure, and then the underlying basis of design. In addition, field/rig morning reports are introduced and reviewed in view of the original design plans.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR engineers within the first two years of a completions and/or workover role, production operations staff, service company engineers and managers, drilling engineers, reservoir engineers, field supervisors and managers, and other asset team members who routinely work with completion or workover staff

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Explain the work product of a completions engineer
  • Describe an initial completion procedure and sketch
  • Translate chronological steps from a procedure to a well sketch
  • Recognize and describe morning reports
  • Recognize the engineering that is required for developing a procedure
  • Explain and provide an example of Basis of Design (BOD)
  • Compare and contrast design and BOD
  • Illustrate and explain the link between management systems and the engineering design process
  • Identify the objectives of a completion
  • Identify and describe each aspect that is to be considered to achieve the two objectives
  • Compare the different drive mechanisms

 

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DURATION: approximately 3.5 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module illustrates the tools and processes for establishing communication between a well and the productive formation(s) accessed by the well. The evolution of shaped charges is presented and the means for delivering perforating charges into a well using various gun configurations is illustrated. The importance of understanding charge performance to select the appropriate charge for a particular set of well conditions is discussed.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, and especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers seeking a well-rounded foundation in artificial lift design and operations.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • The various shaped charges, their design, performance, shot phasing and shot density options, and their advantages and limitations
  • The three primary perforating gun conveyance systems and the various gun types available and their individual features
  • Concepts like perforation tunnel damage, gun standoff, underbalance, gun correlation on depth, and other engineering input requirements for each perforation job design

 

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DURATION: approximately 3.5 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module addresses both the completion process and the physical completion design of unconventional shale wells at the core level. The strongest focus of the module is on horizontal shale wells but also includes a section on coalbed methane and one on heavy oil as well.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR Production Operations Staff, Reservoir Engineers, Facilities Staff Drilling and Completion Engineers, Geoscientists, Field Supervisors and Managers, Field Technicians, Service Company Engineers and Managers.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Describe the purpose and basic operational aspects of wellhead and flow control equipment in wells in unconventional plays
  • Describe the purpose of each of the major components used in a basic well completion in unconventional resources plays, and the impact that drilling practices have on reservoir productivity
  • Describe the function and limitations of each surface and subsurface component of a basic onshore completion in unconventional resources plays
  • Describe the basic properties of completion components materials and their limitations in unconventional resources plays
  • Describe which fluid systems are the most important for implementing successful completions and workovers in wells in unconventional resources plays
  • Describe the most relevant steps for implementing completion procedures in wells in unconventional resources plays, and the proper interaction with all parties involved required
  • Describe the most common techniques used to drill, complete, stimulate, and produce typical wells in coalbed methane reservoirs

 

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DURATION: approximately 2.5 hours

FEE: $250

 

This module illustrates various causes of sand production and its related effect upon producing systems. Alternatives that range from simply tolerating minimal sand production volumes to complex downhole and surface equipment and practices to mitigate the negative effects of sand production are presented. Basic gravel pack design is discussed and a design problem is presented. Expandable sand screens are illustrated.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, and especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers seeking a well-rounded foundation in artificial lift design and operations.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Identify the need for sand control
  • Recognize the causes of sand movement
  • Define what consolidated sand is, and what it is not
  • Identify both non-mechanical and mechanical methods of sand control
  • Recognize that rate restriction is a valid practice to manage sand production
  • Recognize that minor sand volume produced may be tolerated
  • Identify various screen types for sand control
  • Outline aspects of pre-packed screens for sand control
  • Describe the principles of sand control screen and gravel completions
  • Identify the three steps comprising a gravel pack completion design
  • Describe various fluid options for pumping gravel slurry into a gravel pack completion
  • Outline the function of a gravel pack “crossover tool”
  • Outline the function of a gravel pack “shunt tube”
  • Describe the function of a frac pack completion
  • Outline the frac pack completion well performance results
  • Outline the function of an expandable sand screen completion
  • Identify the components of an expandable screen and possible benefits resulting from the use of expandables

 

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DURATION: approximately 4 hours

FEE: $395

 

The reality is that the industry began fracking conventional gas wells in 1947 in the Hugoton Field in southwest Kansas. What is relatively new is the technology and tools which allow us to place multiple hydraulic fracture stimulations along a single lateral in a horizontally drilled unconventional well.
 
The hydraulic fracturing course covers basic rock mechanics, stimulation design considerations, and optimum fracture length at the core level. It covers both fracture acidizing and propped hydraulic stimulations. It reviews propped hydraulic fracturing for both the conventional sandstone reservoirs and unconventional shale reservoirs and explains why the techniques are different.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR Production Operations Staff, Reservoir Engineers, Facilities Staff Drilling and Completion Engineers, Geoscientists, Field Supervisors and Managers, Field Technicians, Service Company Engineers and Managers

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Describe the significance of rock mechanics in all relevant production engineering operations
  • Describe the most common non-chemical stimulation methods, their objectives and limitations in conventional resources plays
  • Describe the most common non-chemical stimulation methods, their objectives and limitations in unconventional resources plays
  • Describe the basic principles of hydraulic fracturing in conventional plays, the difference between acid and proppant treatments, and how to select optimum stimulation candidates
  • Describe the basic principles of hydraulic fracturing in unconventional resource plays, the difference between slickwater and cross-linked treatments, and how to select optimum stimulation candidates

 

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DURATION: approximately 3 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module addresses less than expected production results following initial completion or any well intervention operation and the many possible causes involved. Characteristics of formation damage are explained. Matrix acidizing (acidizing operations conducted at treatment pressures less than fracture pressure) is developed for both limestone and sandstone formations to improve production. Important principles of candidate selection and job planning and execution are addressed.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, and especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers seeking a well-rounded foundation in artificial lift design and operations.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • The basic causes of oilfield formation damage and how they are recognized
  • The concept of “True Formation Damage” and the principles of formation remediation once it has been correctly identified as being the cause of lost production
  • How “pseudo” damage and differs from True Formation Damage
  • The principles of limestone matrix acidizing and the chemistry and reactions involved
  • The principles of sandstone matrix acidizing and the chemistry and reactions involved
  • Formation damage identification and the positive results achieved by successfully conducting matrix acidizing jobs

 

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DURATION: approximately 5 hours

FEE: $395

 

The term “Flow Assurance” and the tools of “Production Chemistry” comprise this module’s content to examine the identification, remediation, and preventive aspects of common wax, asphaltene, scale, and corrosion problems common to most all hydrocarbon production scenarios in one manner or another. Each of these problems requires the application of varied principles and practices of production chemistry in various ways to directly address the control and removal of these complications which negatively impact production. Pictures, illustrations, and examples of typical field problems and challenges faced are developed with the singular goal of presenting proven, least cost, safe remedies to return production to its initial, expected rate.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers; field supervisors; field technicians, service company engineers, and, especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers wanting a foundation in the principles of managing the identification, treatment, prevention, and overall control of oilfield waxes, asphaltenes, inorganic scales, and corrosion.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • Typical oilfield “flow assurance” issues and problems due to: waxes, asphaltenes, inorganic scales, and corrosion
  • How to interpret revealing signs of corrosion and erosion failure, scale formation, and related downhole deposits and how to prevent or minimize their production loss effects
  • How formations become damaged due to related flow assurance and production chemistry issues
  • The importance of collecting data to categorize options to choose an optimum well prevention and treatment plans
  • How to recognize, prevent, remove, and manage organic paraffin and asphaltene field deposits
  • How to recognize, prevent, remove and manage typical common soluble and insoluble scales in oil and gas operations
  • The importance of using oilfield production chemistry to resolve production problems
  • The conditions required for the formation of gas hydrates
  • How ice crystals and methane in pipelines can lead to severe plugging of lines if not prevented from occurring or regularly removed by pigging operations
  • The methods employed to treat gas hydrates in pipelines

 

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DURATION: approximately 3 hours

FEE: $395

 

The early detection of “Problems” in producing and injection wells is one of a Production Engineer’s primary responsibilities. The earlier that one recognizes a problem exists, the less severe the problem, the sooner the problem can be corrected, and the sooner the production rate will be restored. This module focuses on four primary aspects of “Problem Wells”: 1) Causes, 2) Effects, 3) Detection, and 4) Prevention.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR Production Operations Staff, Reservoir Engineers, Facilities Staff, Drilling and Completion Engineers, Geoscientists, Field Supervisors and Managers, Field Technicians, Service Company Engineers and Managers

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Identify the characteristics of "Problem Wells"
  • Recognize that the term "Problem Well" can be applied to both producing and injection wells
  • Recognize the many different causes of "Problem Wells"
  • Recognize how these different causes manifest themselves in either productivity reductions or operational problems associated with our wells
  • Recognize the various diagnostic methods available to determine that a problem(s) exists
  • Understand the various Production Logging Tools (PLT) available to determine the causes of our well problems
  • Determine the “Problem Wells” based on a table
  • Properly diagnose a “Problem Well” based on information given in a table
  • Understand the importance of complying with well component requirements to ensure the integrity of a well though the life of the well
  • Understand the process of Root Cause Failure Analysis as it applies to ESP failures
  • Recognize many of the methods available to us to prevent wells from becoming “Problem Wells”

 

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DURATION: approximately 3 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module describes the operating capabilities of the main types of intervention techniques, including bullheading, slickline, electric line, coiled tubing, hydraulic workover units, and workover rigs. The general relative costs of each type of method will be discussed as well as the main operational abilities of circulating, rotating, pushing/pulling, and entering a "live" well.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR engineers within the first two years of a completions and/or workover role, production operations staff, service company engineers and managers, drilling engineers, reservoir engineers, field supervisors and managers, and other asset team members who routinely work with completion or workover staff

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Describe the main components of a/an:

- Slickline unit
- Braided wireline unit
- Electric line unit
- Conventional workover (completion) unit
- Snubbing (hydraulic workover) unit
- Coiled tubing unit

  • Compare the critical operational benefit and/or constraints of each of these methods

 

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DURATION: approximately 5 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module introduces four characteristics of optimum oil and gas depletion production principles, namely:
 
 1. Effects of Geological and Reservoir Properties
 2. Inflow and Outflow Performance
 3. Tubing Strings, Outflow, and Lift Mechanics
 4. Field Development Planning
 
Each is examined to illustrate the importance of up front data acquisition to perform studies to understand target design objectives for both conventional oil and gas reservoirs and unconventional shale oil and shale gas reservoirs and unconventional coal bed methane reservoirs.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, and especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers seeking a well-rounded foundation in artificial lift design and operations.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

  • Effects of depositional environment and the rock cycle in the formation of hydrocarbon accumulations
  • Reservoir engineering principles that guide optimum conventional and unconventional reservoir development
  • The important characteristics of oilfield Inflow and Outflow and their related mathematical flow equations and applied principles required for system modeling
  • Why a well flows on natural flow and the eventual requirement for artificial lift to maximize overall recovery as reservoir depletion occurs and reservoir energy diminishes
  • Special considerations for tubing regarding erosional velocity and critical flow condition
  • Key field development parameters that are common to all well designed hydrocarbon exploitation systems

 

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DURATION: approximately 4 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module presents an overview of the planning and execution required to achieve the quality primary cementing of well casing strings to successfully isolate a wellbore’s geological column, including the well’s productive zone(s). Equipment and cement displacement practices are illustrated and described as well as methods to assess the resultant cement sheath surrounding casing following a cementing job. Preliminary lab work to formulate primary cement blends is described. And, various methods are presented in the remedial repair of poorly cemented zones which can lead to life of the well production problems. Several different cement squeeze techniques are explained and recommended practices are described.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, and especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers seeking a well-rounded foundation in artificial lift design and operations.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • The manufacturing processes to blend composite materials that make up oilfield cement
  • The various uses of additives to modify cement properties
  • The cementing tools at the surface and downhole and the related cement displacement process to achieve a quality primary cement job to isolate a casing string
  • The casing cement evaluation tools and methods to assess cement job quality
  • The various practices that comprise options to attempt repair of primary cementing jobs that are referred to as cement squeeze operations
  • How to calculate typical casing string cement volume requirements
  • How to evaluate a cement bond log and make recommendations

 

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DURATION: approximately 4.5 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module provides an overview of proven basic principles: to design rod pump, PCP pump, jet pump, and plunger lift artificial lift systems to optimize production and recovery. Each of these artificial lift types have specific operating characteristics that are available to apply to operate appropriate candidate wells. Each will be examined using theory, videos and animations, and exercises to study and evaluate when and how to select these differing artificial lift systems for unique completion conditions. Oil recovery and gas well de-watering principles using appropriate artificial lift systems are described. Conventional and unconventional reservoir applications are cited.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, and especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers seeking a well-rounded foundation in production engineering.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • How to evaluate reservoir and well conditions to choose the appropriate artificial lift system for each set of conditions
  • How rod pump, PCP pump, jet pump, and plunger lift artificial lift systems work
  • How to design and optimize rod pump, PCP pump, jet pump, and plunger lift completions
  • Why surveillance and monitoring of artificial lift systems is essential
  • Various API and related design standards and practices that represent key, proven artificial lift system performance fundamentals

 

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DURATION: approximately 3.5 hours

FEE: $395

 

This module will examine the reasons why and when artificial lift systems are required and the methodology to select the most appropriate artificial lift technology to meet reservoir and completion requirements. Next, the module will specifically describe the engineering design of and operational requirements of Gas Lift and Electrical Submersible Pump well completions types.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, and especially engineers starting a work assignment in production engineering and operations or other engineers seeking a well-rounded foundation in artificial lift design and operations.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • Why artificial lift is required to maximize ultimate recovery 
  • How to evaluate reservoir and well conditions to choose the appropriate artificial lift system for each set of conditions
  • How each artificial lift system works
  • How to design and optimize gas lift and ESP completions 
  • Why surveillance and monitoring of artificial lift systems is essential 
  • Various API and related design standards and practices that represent key, proven artificial lift performance fundamentals

 

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DURATION: approximately 3 hours

FEE: $395

 

Experience indicates that surface fluid measurements are not adequate enough to describe the efficiency of the downhole production system. In new completions, production logging services are used both to ensure optimum ultimate recovery and to investigate production problems brought to light by surface performance. In older wells, the logs aid in identifying mechanical issues and thus assist in planning remedial work for declining producers. If properly planned and executed, production logging is an intrusive measurement method which will help to diagnose the health of producer or injector wells.

 

This module describes the principles of wireline-run cased hole logging tools. Included in the family of production logging devices are flowmeters, high-resolution thermometers, gradiomanometers, and through-tubing calipers. To evaluate downhole flowrates, these instruments enable recording of hole sizes, temperature and flow rate profiles. Accurate depth control is ensured by gamma ray logs and counting casing collars.

 

 

DESIGNED FOR petroleum engineers, production operations staff, reservoir engineers, facilities staff, drilling and completion engineers, geologists, field supervisors and managers, field technicians, service company engineers and managers, as an introduction to Production Logging within the frame of a production engineering curriculum.

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • The principles of cased-hole evaluation tools
  • The typical applications and justification for running cased-hole evaluation tools
  • The conveyance methods for running cased-hole evaluation tools in the field
  • The principles of wireline-run cased hole evaluation tools
  • The principles and operation of the logging tools associated with flowmeter tools
  • The principles and operation of the basic temperature logs
  • The principles and operation of basic radioactive tracer logs
  • The principles and operation of basic spinner flowmeter logs
  • The principles and operation of the gradiomanometer log
  • The performance of cased hole logs in single phase flow
  • The advantages of running multiple tools within a Production Combination Tool
  • The added value of running a downhole video log in addition to production logs

 

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DURATION: approximately 4 hours

FEE: $395

 

The goal of production logging is to obtain an accurate interpretation of downhole tool measurements of fluid holdups and fluid velocities. Achieving this goal requires an understanding of the equipment used at the wellsite to make these measurements and the equipment used to deploy the tools downhole. It is important to know where the tools are in the well with relation to the well components described in the well schematic. Because most production logging tools only measure what is inside the innermost casing string, it is also necessary to know when the primary cement job may be seriously degrading permitting flow behind pipe. This module covers wellsite equipment, gamma ray, casing collar and depth measurements, and acoustic methods to determine cement quality behind pipe.

 

 

 

YOU WILL LEARN

  • The basic components of surface equipment used to log a flowing well
  • The basic methods used to flow a well
  • The fundamental types of completions used in typical wells and the problems associated with acquiring and interpreting production log data in these types of completions
  • The basic information shown in a wellbore sketch and how to use this when planning production logging jobs
  • How gamma ray and casing collar tools work and how to use them to depth align production logs to open hole logs
  • How wireline depth measurements are made and how they compare with pipe tallies and coiled tubing depth measurements
  • How conventional cement bond and ultrasonic cement bond logging tools work, what they measure, and how to do a qualitative interpretation of cement bond quality

 

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